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Social Security Disability

When you are disabled from a disease or injury and unable to work, you are unable to earn a living. If the disability prevents you from working for one year or longer, you may be entitled to Social Security Disability benefits. At Epperly & Follis, our Social Security Disability lawyers pursue claims for both disabled adults and disabled children, or family members of the disabled person.
The Social Security Administration (SSA) is a federal agency that administers retirement and disability benefits, and defines disability as a person's inability to perform any kind of work for which he or she is suited because of an injury or a medical condition. The disability should be expected to last for at least one year, or result in death. The disability can be a result of a physical or mental condition, or a combination of a number of such conditions. To be considered disabled, a person must establish that he or she cannot perform his or her past work and an inability to perform other types of employment.
The Social Security system provides benefits for the disabled under two separate but related programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI). To get disability benefits from Social Security, you must apply. How much a person receives as a benefit depends on his or her work history, resources, and other available income.
The Social Security system provides benefits for the disabled under two separate but related programs: Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) and Supplemental Security Income (SSI).
  • Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI). SSDI is an “insurance” program that pays disability benefit to persons (as well as to their certain disabled dependents) who have paid into the Social Security trust fund through Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA taxes). The employers of these insured individuals make equal FICA contributions on behalf of the employee.
  • Supplemental Security Income (SSI). SSI is a financial aid, or needs-based program that provides a basic income for disabled people who meet specific low-income guidelines. Regardless of your lack of employment history and age, you can receive SSI benefits when you become disabled.
Epperly & Follis  |  Social Security Disability
Have you been denied benefits? Statistics show that only 30-40 percent of disability claims are approved on the first try. This means 60%-70% of all disability claims are denied on the first try and that is why you should contact the attorneys at Epperly & Follis. People represented by attorneys are more successful in obtaining Social Security benefits than people without legal representation. At Epperly & Follis, our attorneys will find out what benefits you are entitled to, and how we can help you get them.
If you have been denied eligibility for SSDI, you have 60 days from the date of the denial letter to request an appeal, so the sooner you contact Epperly & Follis, the better. There are typically four levels of appeal, including:
  • Reconsideration
  • Hearing by an administrative law judge
  • Review by the appeals council
  • Federal court complaint
As soon as your application is denied, call Epperly & Follis so we can begin preparing your case and gathering evidence. You can trust us to assist you with this process and help you reach a positive conclusion.
If you have any questions regarding Social Security, contact us for a free consultation today at 1-888-703-0109 or (804) 648-6480, or contact us via our online Contact Form